SPECIAL COVERAGE
CHANDIGARH

LUDHIANA

DELHI


THE TRIBUNE SPECIALS
50 YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE

TERCENTENARY CELEBRATIONS
L E T T E R S    T O    T H E    E D I T O R

Nuclear plant to benefit power consumers

This refers to the editorial, 'Kudankulam N-plant: SC clears in larger public interest' (May 8). The Supreme Court's clearance for the commissioning of the Kudankulam nuclear plant in Tamil Nadu is good news. It has rightly asked the government to abide by all safety measures and ensure that people suffer no harm in any form with the functioning of the plant. The nuclear power plant is essential for the generation of electricity. Also, people of Tamil Nadu will benefit as the plant will provide power to millions of houses in the cities, towns and villages of the state at a very low cost.

On the other hand, most of the political parties have been playing dirty politics by inciting the people to protest the commissioning of the plant by putting forth the hazards of nuclear energy. They took undue advantage of the Fukushima (Japan) nuclear plant accident to raise public sentiments against the Kudankulam N-plant. As the SC has asked the government to regularly monitor it through the help of the Nuclear Power Corporation of India after obtaining clearance from the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board and the Department of Atomic Energy on various parameters, efforts to oppose it should not be made.

R K KAPOOR, Chandigarh

II

At last, the nuclear plant has been given a green signal by the Supreme Court of India. The public in general and political leaders in particular must appreciate the importance of nuclear power for growth and development of the country. Also, this is the duty of the government to provide utmost safety to the nuclear plant. The apprehension of political leaders in this case is merely an effort to win political mileage.

The following is, I still remember, what leaders of the Opposition (undivided Punjab) had said regarding the Bhakra Dam: The government is supplying toned water to farmers after taking out the component of electricity.

VK ANAND, Patiala





Rising population

This refers to the article 'Check population too for food security' (April 17) by Dr Manjit S Kang. The writer has rightly stressed on controlling the rising population to ensure food security to all people. Efforts to achieve increased productivity of wheat and rice have strained our natural resources. It has led to the falling water table in Punjab, Haryana and western Uttar Pradesh. India is set to surpass China in terms of population by 2025.

Illiteracy, poverty, lack of birth control measures and early marriages of girls are some of the major reasons for the rising population. That the menace has reached crisis proportions is very true as we witness a heavy rush at bus stands, railway stations, hospitals, marketplaces, etc. The rapid pace of industrialisation and urbanisation has greatly impacted the quality of living. China has been able to contain population growth while we find it an impossible task because we are politically divided. Our politicians and the public must take every possible step that can check its rising graph.

RAVI SHARMA, Jammu

Tackling earthquakes

Apropos the editorial 'Seismic warnings' (April 19), the unplanned and haphazard construction of houses and colonies across India can cause a mammoth loss of lives and property during an earthquake. Even today, most new houses and big buildings hardly follow quake-resistant techniques which can be dangerous. Though all people cannot reconstruct their houses, offices and other structures adhering to safe and new building techniques, owners of new buildings must not avoid life-saving guidelines. Moreover, the government should give proper training to the masses for tackling an earthquake.

SUBHASH C TANEJA, Gurgaon

Undeserved honour

It was really strange that Sarabjit Singh, an ordinary convict who was killed following an attack on him in a Pakistani jail, has been declared a national martyr whereas people like Subhas Chandra Bose who had laid down their lives for the freedom of the country have not been given this honour so far despite the country having been under the rule of the Congress, the Janata Party, the BJP and other political parties at different times.

MANJIT SINGH JUNEJA, Mohali

Health missions

The editorial 'Mission urban health' ( May 9) was full of wisdom. To my mind, health for all is a good step and deserves to be strengthened by the three-tier governments with vertical health services, including preventive, promotive and curative aspects in totality. This is necessary and sufficient for poverty eradication. Moreover, it never appears to be mere lip-service of poverty alleviation programmes, including the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) and the National Urban Health Mission (NUHM).

We need proper, productive and practical use of the allocated resources which calls for good governance as a strategy. We should adopt zero tolerance against corruption in the implementation of well-conceived programmes like NRHM.

DR MM GOEL, Kurukshetra

 



Welcome pullback of troops

With the mutual withdrawal of the troops to their previous positions, the border stand-off between India and China has been resolved peacefully, courtesy persistent diplomatic efforts and deployment of the Indo-Tibetan Border Police (editorial 'Victory for diplomacy', May 7).

The calculated and proactive stance by the Indian government has proved beyond doubt that we can face any external threat to our sovereignty and territorial integrity. It has not only forced China to see reason and restore the status quo along the LAC but also silenced the analysts who accused the Indian government of being too weak to take on China militarily. Owing to their other pressing concerns, both India and China have adopted a pragmatic approach and avoided a military showdown. It is hoped that the upcoming visit of the Chinese premier to India on May 20 paves the way for better mutual understanding between the two Asian giants and both make concerted efforts to promote their economic interests and peace in the region.

Meanwhile, India must ask China to judiciously demarcate the LAC as soon as possible. Also, it should acquire adequate modern equipment for effective surveillance and reconnaissance on the border.

D S Kang, Hoshiarpur

 

Top


HOME PAGE | Punjab | Haryana | Jammu & Kashmir | Himachal Pradesh | Regional Briefs | Nation | Opinions |
| Business | Sports | World | Letters | Chandigarh | Ludhiana | Delhi |
| Calendar | Weather | Archive | Subscribe | Suggestion | E-mail |