15% women with heart ailments below 50 years of age: PGI data : The Tribune India

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15% women with heart ailments below 50 years of age: PGI data

Study finds 44% women were obese, only 1% had adequate fruit intake in daily diet

15% women with heart ailments below 50 years of age: PGI data

Data of previous three years at the PGI has showed that 13-15% of women, who suffered from cardiovascular diseases, were less than 50 years of age. Risk factors of heart diseases are much more common in women. - File photo



Tribune News Service

Chandigarh, May 5

Data of previous three years at the PGI has showed that 13-15% of women, who suffered from cardiovascular diseases, were less than 50 years of age. Risk factors of heart diseases are much more common in women.

Sedentary lifestyle to blame

Sedentary lifestyle is the root cause of all risk factors of cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and obesity. Most of the working women don’t do any form of physical activity like exercise because of the dual responsibility of work and family.

The women with heart diseases have worse outcome than men. In a recent study, Dr Neelam, Associate Professor of Cardiology, PGI, showed that 44% women who suffered from cardiovascular diseases, were obese and only 1% of them had adequate fruit intake in their daily diet. Women also had poor awareness about heart diseases and associated risk factors. Despite these known facts, knowledge sharing and awareness about risk factors from health care workers is minimal. Only 47% of the women were advised to reduce salt intake and less than 30% were advised to quit smoking and consume adequate fruits.

Research like this is widely read and discussed among the medical fraternity, however, non-medicos largely remain ignorant of such important facts.

Considering these alarming facts, it was realised that health care workers already burdened need helping hand to prevent heart diseases. So it is imperative to upgrade existing knowledge among non-medical skilled professional so that they can act as “Health promotors/Ambassadors”.

To achieve this mission, Dr Neelam organised a CME, which brought together medical and non-medical professionals at the same platform of knowledge sharing.

Dr Lipi Uppal, Assistant Professor, Cardiology, GMCH-32, discussed about the rising burden of heart diseases amongst women. Dr Neelam Kaul, senior cardiologist, discussed conventional and emerging women specific risk factors of heart diseases. Dr Ruchi Gupta discussed various tools to know future risk of heart diseases and when to seek specialist care.

Stress is one of the major risks of heart diseases in India. In a busy schedule and highly competitive work life, practical ways to reduce stress were discussed. Role of yoga and proper time management to reduce stress were emphasised. Obesity pandemic is increasing in women compared to men. Obesity leads to many diseases like heart failure blood clotting and diabetes.

Dr Rama Walia, Endocrinologist from the PGI, discussed all adverse outcomes and management of obesity. As shown in various studies, Indian diet is not heart-healthy one, Indians consume more salt and sugar and less of vegetables and fruits. Dr Nancy stressed the importance of healthy diet and how to consume a balanced diet even in a hectic work schedule.

Sedentary lifestyle is the root cause of all risk factors of cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and obesity. Most of the working women don’t do any form of physical activity like exercise because of the dual responsibility of work and family.

Dr Somya Saxena shed light on the importance of being physically active and highlighted simple/practical steps of doing physical activity at home/workplace. Her talk gave valuable insight into optimising cardiac health amidst lifestyle, reaffirming the significance of prioritising physical activity in today’s fast paced world.

Today’s demanding work schedule leads to inevitable stress that bring unhealthy sleep habits in people. Dr Ritu Nehra, Clinical Psychologist, discussed the importance of healthy sleep habits and enumerated the ways to get a healthy sleep.

Cardiovascular disease is a major health concern in India, responsible for a significant number of deaths each year. Risk factors of cardiovascular diseases mainly hypertension, diabetes, obesity, sedentary lifestyle and stress are much more common in India than in the Western countries. Heart disease is not exclusive to men, it also affects women. It is the leading cause of death in women and even young women are not spared.

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