Rights and duties

Fix institutional gaps for credible justice delivery

Rights and duties

CHIEF Justice of India (CJI) NV Ramana could not have put it better: a constitutional republic shall thrive only when its citizens are aware of what their Constitution envisages, and to that end, every individual must be made aware of the rights and duties. - File photo

CHIEF Justice of India (CJI) NV Ramana could not have put it better: a constitutional republic shall thrive only when its citizens are aware of what their Constitution envisages, and to that end, every individual must be made aware of the rights and duties. The law graduates, too, can make a difference by becoming instruments of social change, as appealed by the CJI. All things considered, it would be injudicious to label lack of awareness as the weak link; that unkind distinction goes to the slow wheels of justice, invariably leading to disillusionment and distrust. The right to a fair trial, equal access to justice and a sense of trust are vital components of the social contract between the citizens and the state. Mere explanation of the constitutional provisions in simpler terms won’t help. The systems should be seen to be working.

A collective duty to promoting constitutional culture would encompass paying attention to the institutional inadequacies, which are often alluded to by top judges and Law Commission reports. The correlation between the availability of judicial infrastructure and justice delivery is well established. In 2016, the then CJI, TS Thakur, got visibly upset as he listed the case backlog, the judicial vacancies and the infrastructure woes that impacted justice delivery and credibility. Six years down the line, the same urgency is visible in CJI Ramana’s call for an overhaul of the country’s judicial infrastructure at the district and subordinate levels. The pandemic brought out the shortcomings in no uncertain terms. Forced to conduct their business in the digital mode, only one-third of lower courts had proper facilities. Justice delivery, as a result, was dealt a severe blow.

The CJI, in his reference to the transformation in the legal profession, touched upon the slow fading out of the importance of pedigree and hereditary practice, as first-generation lawyers shine through. As he pins hopes on the young talented minds showing their commitment to legal aid, the focus has to be on fixing the gaps that hamper the delivery of justice.

#nv ramana

Tribune Shorts


Top News

CBI raids at over 10 locations including residence of Manish Sisodia in excise policy case

CBI raids at Manish Sisodia's house, 20 other places in excise policy case

The CBI has registered an FIR in connection with alleged irr...

Slamming CBI raid, Bhagwant Mann says Manish Sisodia best education minister of independent India

Slamming CBI raid, Bhagwant Mann says Manish Sisodia best education minister of independent India

Punjab ministers Harjot Bains and Chetan Jouramajra also sla...

Ludhiana police crack case in 24 hours, trace kidnapped child to Bathinda

Ludhiana police crack case in 24 hours, trace kidnapped child to Bathinda

5 kidnappers arrested; wanted to sell the child for Rs 50,00...

Working to reduce wait times for visas for students: Canadian High Commission in India

Working to reduce wait time for visas for students: Canadian High Commission in India

Canada is one of the popular destinations for Indian student...

Cities

View All