Packing a punch in good, old kachori : The Tribune India

Join Whatsapp Channel

food talk

Packing a punch in good, old kachori

Packing a punch in good, old kachori

MATAR KI KACHORI



Pushpesh Pant

THERE are kachoris of many types. There is the delicate bedami popular in Delhi and Varanasi and its Bengali cousin Radhaballabhi, the reigning queen of Bengali kochuris. Then, there is the bulky, robustly-spiced pyaaz ki kachori and the dipped-in-syrup mawa kachori in Rajasthan to soothe the palate. Usually, the filling of pyaaz kachori is prepared with spicy lentil paste. Kolkata people are also very fond of koraishutir kochuri, made with green peas and paired with hing wale alu dom draped in a sauce-like gravy. Varanasi has its own version of dainty Marwadi matar ki kachori — small in size but packing a great flavourful punch.

The matar kachori recipe that we share with our readers this time has an interesting back story and a different but satisfying mouth-feel.

Let’s begin at the beginning. More than 150 years ago, the British colonised the sub-continent. This was a time when Indians were transported as indentured labour to Burma. The dislocated poor were employed in plantations and made to work on roads and railway lines. There were some who followed them on their own, smelling opportunities and setting up shops and businesses in the foreign land next door to Bengal. Marwadi families were some of these intrepid pioneers. They made Burma their home and lived there for generations till the Japanese invasion during World War-II turned the world topsy-turvy. This triggered the first wave of reverse exodus and these home-bound refugees brought back exotic flavours with memories of this second home they had to leave behind yet again. In the decades to follow, countless families, with great grit, rebuilt their lives. Small Burmese colonies sprouted in cities like Madras and Jaipur, courtesy these refugees in homeland. Years in forced or voluntary exile has left an indelible imprint on their food. Food consultants Ratika Bhargav and Richa Khetan are descendants of one such family. They remember their grandparents’ ritually cooking pure veg Marwadi-Burmese khow suey once a year to revive nostalgia of the happier times in a distant land that had become home. Then, there were traditional dishes that kept alive memories of the original homeland. Matar ki kachori belongs to this list. Ratika and Richa are busy researching the Marwadi-Burmese recipes, trying to give new life to tasty hybrids that were relished before the word fusion had entered the kitchen space.

But let’s return to this kachori. It lets you taste the bliss of sweet green peas like nothing else can. Quite addictive!

MATAR KI KACHORI

Ingredients (makes 10)

For Kachori

Maida.....................................................1 cup

Oil.......................................1/4 cup plus to deep fry

Salt..............................................As per taste

Filling

Peas (shelled and coarsely ground).................2 cups

Oil...........................................................1 tbsp

Hing..........................................................1 tsp

Jeera........................................................1 tsp

Dhaniya powder.....................................1 tsp

Red chilli powder....................................1 tsp

Amchoor powder....................................1 tsp

Sugar........................................................1 tsp

Salt...............................................As per taste

Method: Heat oil in a non-stick pan. Add hing and jeera. Add the peas’ paste and lightly stir fry on medium flame for a couple of minutes. Add all the spices and sugar. Mix well and stir fry for a minute or so. Avoid over-cooking as it will make it dry. Let the filling mixture come to room temperature.

Knead maida with oil and a little water to obtain a soft dough and keep kneading till it becomes elastic. Let it rest for 15 minutes. Divide in equal portions and shape into balls. Flatten between palms. Pressing lightly with the thumb, make a hollow in the middle. Pack in the filling generously. Reshape in small rounds, then flatten again. Roll with a belan into small discs. Heat oil in a kadahi. Do not over heat. Deep fry the kachoris on medium heat in small batches, flipping once in 2-3 seconds with a slotted spoon till these are golden brown.

Repeat the process till all the kachoris have been fried. Enjoy with imli-gud ki saunth wali chutney or hari chutney.

#Rajasthan


Top News

Delhi records 44.4 degrees Celsius, ‘red alert’ issued due to heatwave

Unrelenting heat disrupts daily life; Met office issues a red warning for Punjab, Haryana, Chandigarh, Delhi

The mercury reaches or surpasses 47 degrees Celsius in at le...

Gopi Thotakura becomes first Indian space tourist on Blue Origin’s private astronaut launch

Gopi Thotakura becomes first Indian space tourist on Blue Origin’s private astronaut launch

Thotakura was selected as one of the six crew members for th...

All Indian students safe in Bishkek: Embassy

All Indian students safe in Bishkek, says embassy

4 people, including three Egyptians, have been arrested


Cities

View All