Rohtak: Experts warn farmers against overuse of pesticides for crops : The Tribune India

Rohtak: Experts warn farmers against overuse of pesticides for crops

Rohtak: Experts warn farmers against overuse of pesticides for crops


Tribune News Service

Rohtak, September 1

Excessive and injudicious use of chemical fertilisers and pesticides by farmers to increase their crop yield has rendered a considerable chunk of the region’s soil infertile, leading to serious health disorders such as cancer and infertility in humans.

Many cultivate on leased land

Since many farmers cultivate the land taken on oral lease, they do not bother about the long-term impact of excessive use of chemicals on the health of the soil. Dr Rajinder Chaudhary, Adviser, Kudarti kheti abhiyan, Haryana

The over-dependence of farmers on chemical farm inputs is reducing soil’s natural fertility.

Agricultural experts warn that the overuse of chemicals will have disastrous consequences on health in future.

“Besides the quest for a high yield, lack of knowledge and high cost of requisite farm inputs also lead to injudicious use of pesticides and chemical fertilisers,” said Dr Rajinder Chaudhary, former professor of economics at Maharshi Dayanand University (MDU), Rohtak. He is serving as Adviser, Kudarti Kheti Abhiyan, Haryana, at present.

Dr Chaudhary points out that most farmers are advised on farm inputs by their neighbouring farmers or shopkeepers selling seeds and fertilisers.

“Studies have shown that pesticides have been used up to 750 times of the recommended quantity or safe limit, which is alarming,” he said.

Dr Chaudhary said since many farmers cultivate the land taken on oral lease, they do not bother about the long-term impact of excessive use of chemicals on the health of the soil. “Apart from the excessive and injudicious use of chemical inputs, continuation of conventional farming involving wheat-paddy cycle also affects soil fertility,” the expert added.

Sanjay, a farmer of Madina village in Rohtak, said chemical-free farming had become difficult in the current scenario owing to low productivity, and risk of diseases and pest attacks on crops.

On the other hand, Jagmender Kundu, an organic farmer, is of the opinion that most farmers preferred chemical-based farming as organic or natural farming required more care and efforts.

Experts feel that adoption of natural farming and agronomic techniques holds the key to making agriculture a sustainable.

#Agriculture #cancer #rohtak

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