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Republic Day -- What it means to me

Our student readers reveal the reverence and pride they feel for their nation

Republic Day -- What it means to me

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 A formidable Republic

"We owe a lot to the Indians who taught us to count without which no worthwhile scientific discovery could be made" said the man with the mightiest mind on this globe — Albert Einstein.

Shivali Sethi

India is applauded by the legends for its distinctive authenticity. India remains one of the most ethnically diverse countries in the world. Apart from its many religions and sects, India is home to innumerable castes and tribes, as well as to more than a dozen major and hundreds of minor linguistic groups from several language families unrelated to one another.

On January 26, 2021, India will celebrate its 72nd Republic Day. In Delhi, magnificent parades are organised by regiments of the Indian Army, Navy, Air Force, police and paramilitary forces at Rajpath. All states showcase their culture, uniqueness by building beautiful tableaus during the parade. There are air shows by the Air Force and much more to commemorate this day.

Republic Day has been celebrated every year in India since January 26, 1950, to honour the date on which the Constitution of India came into effect. India was a colony of the British for over 200 years and became independent from the rule of the British Raj following the Indian independence movement. While India became independent on August 14, 1947, it still didn't have a permanent constitution, and Indian laws were based on a modified version of the British established, Government of India Act, 1935.

The draft of the constitution was submitted to the Indian Constituent Assembly on November 4, 1947. Over the course of 166 days, that were spread over two years, the 308 members of the Assembly met in sessions that were open to the public and made some modifications. Finally, on January 24, 1950, the Assembly members signed two handwritten copies of the Constitution, one in English and one in Hindi. And two days later history was made. On that day began Dr Rajendra Prasad's first term of office as the President of the Indian Union. The Constituent Assembly became the Parliament of India under the transitional provisions of the new Constitution. This is the reason every year Republic Day holds a soft corner in every true Indian's heart.

The history of the nation gives a glimpse into the magnanimity of its evolution - from a country reeling under colonialism, to one of the leading economies in the global scenario within a span of 50 years. More than anything, the nationalistic fervour of the people is the contributing force behind the culmination of such a development. This transformation of the nation instills a sense of national pride in the heart of every Indian within the country and abroad, and this section is a modest attempt at keeping its flame alive. Indeed, India is a formidable country.

Shivali Sethi, Class IX, Ashiana Public School, Chandigarh


Riddhi Sharda

It’s a new beginning

The world is full of different people and different people means different thinking and different perspective. But what if we don't have this freedom to think or the right to speech? It is the constitution of a country that grants this liberty.

The Constitution of India came into effect on January 26, 1950, and every year this day is celebrated as Republic Day with zeal.

Parades are carried out by the armed forces at Rajpath, New Delhi, before the President and the civilians are honoured with awards. It is a national holiday all over the country. In my opinion, Republic Day is not just a national holiday but a day to show gratitude to our Constitution and its makers. Today, whatever rights we have, are all because of it. No one can take away our rights and if someone does so, we have the freedom to approach the judiciary. The Constitution safeguards our rights. Yet, somewhere I feel we are not contributing our part. We talk about our rights but what about our duties? Probably, because the Constitution is not a human, it can't cheat or can't turn its back upon us.

On Republic Day, it is our duty to not just watch the parade or salute the National Flag for the sake of doing it but also abide by the Constitution to make India republic in a true sense. We must be alert about our rights and duties and be respectful to others just the way we are before the Tricolour. We are fortunate enough to be born and brought up in a republic country as a republic citizen. Alas! I feel that India is not republic in a true sense. Republic Day was indeed a new beginning for India from subjects to citizens, from slaves to becoming independent and then finally republic. Why not celebrate this new beginning in a new and innovative way?

Let's celebrate it like a New Year! Take a resolution to at least follow one fundamental duty and safeguard one right of others from being violating.

Riddhi Sharda, Class IX, Ashiana Public School, Chandigarh

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