NASA's Landsat 9 satellite releases first images of Earth

NASA's Landsat 9 satellite releases first images of Earth

The first image collected by Landsat 9, on October 31, 2021, shows remote coastal islands and inlets of the Kimberly region of Western Australia. Photo credit: NASA/USGS

WASHINGTON

NASA's Earth-observing satellite Landsat 9 has collected its first light images of Earth, capturing critical observations about our changing planet.

Launched on September 27, Landsat 9 is a joint mission between NASA and the US Geological Survey (USGS).

See the rest of the images here

The images, all acquired October 31, provide a preview of how the mission will help people manage vital natural resources and understand the impact of climate change. The images add to Landsat's unparalleled data record that spans nearly 50 years of space-based Earth observation.

Landsat programme "has the proven power to not only improve lives but also save lives", said NASA Administrator Bill Nelson in a statement.

NASA will continue to work with USGS to help decision makers "better understand the devastation of the climate crisis, manage agricultural practices, preserve precious resources and respond more effectively to natural disasters", Nelson added.

These first light images show Detroit, Michigan, with neighbouring Lake St Clair, the intersection of cities and beaches along a changing Florida coastline and images from Navajo Country in Arizona that will add to the wealth of data helping monitor crop health and manage irrigation water.

The new images also provided data about the changing landscapes of the Himalayas in High Mountain Asia and the coastal islands and shorelines of northern Australia.

Landsat 9 is similar in design to its predecessor, Landsat 8, which was launched in 2013 and remains in orbit, but features several improvements.

Landsat 9 can differentiate more than 16,000 shades of a given wavelength colour; Landsat 7, the satellite being replaced, detects only 256 shades. This increased sensitivity will allow Landsat users to see much more subtle changes than ever before.

Landsat 9 carries two instruments that capture imagery: the Operational Land Imager 2 (OLI-2), which detects visible, near-infrared and shortwave-infrared light in nine wavelengths, and the Thermal Infrared Sensor 2 (TIRS-2), which detects thermal radiation in two wavelengths to measure Earth's surface temperatures and its changes.

These instruments will provide Landsat 9 users with essential information about crop health, irrigation use, water quality, wildfire severity, deforestation, glacial retreat, urban expansion, and more.

USGS will operate Landsat 9 along with Landsat 8, and together the two satellites will collect approximately 1,500 images of Earth's surface every day, covering the globe every eight days.

—      IANS

Tribune Shorts


Top Stories

India’s first Omicron cases: One is South African, second a local doctor with no travel history

India’s first Omicron cases: One is South African, second a local doctor with no travel history

Five contacts of doctor also test positive and their samples...

India's first two Omicron cases detected in Karnataka, says government

India's first two Omicron cases detected in Karnataka

Govt says need not panic about Omicron detection but awarene...

Supreme Court slams Delhi govt over ‘Red Light On, Gaadi Off’ campaign

Supreme Court sets 24-hour deadline for govt to come up with concrete measures on air pollution

Bench hints at setting up task force; pulls up Delhi govt fo...

Delhi schools to be closed from Friday till further orders due to pollution

Delhi schools to be closed till further orders due to pollution

The decision comes after the Supreme Court on Thursday pulls...

Cities

View All